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20130228
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
. now, where has the u.s. supreme court been on all of this? where has the u.s. supreme court been? well, far from protecting the interests of discreet and insular minorities, far from doing that, the u.s. supreme court has been busy defending this war at every turn. the u.s. supreme court or over the last couple decades has eviscerated amendment protections against unreasonable searches and seizures granting to the police the authority to stop, frisk, search just about anyone anywhere without any probable cause or reasonable suspicion, not a shred of evidence of criminal activity as long as they get consent. now, what's consent? consent is when a police officer walks up to a young man, officer walks up to the young man with one hand on his gun and says, son, put your arms up in the air so i can search you, see if you've got anything on you. kid says, uh-huh. that young man just waived his fourth amendment rights against unreasonable searches and seizures. law enforcement doesn't have to have a shred of evidence to support that frisk now that the young man has consented, of course, belie
our sovereignty said china, the u.s., now canada, even leaders doesn't permit us to monitor. doesn't permit us to report to international body. doesn't permit an international body to tell us what to do with emission. sovereignty has become the obstacle to cooperation and increasely made states look more and more dysfunctional. how is that the most powerful, well equipped military nation in the world has ever seen the united states of america can't bring a handful of terrorists to heal in benghazi or mali, or afghanistan. the asymmetry between a massive military based on big ships, planes, and bombs and the reality of every day -- cross borders that a symmetry means that the war machine, the war machine of the greatest state there ever was is largelier relevant to the security threats we face. as we learn on 9/11 when in this city, a handful of hijackers living in the united states for years hijacked our planes and turned them to weapons. they didn't have to be given weapons by anyone. they seize them and use them and created devastation here. that, again, is a sign of this new asy
into scientology. they have a definite responsibility to understand what is going on there. >> in 1989, the u.s. supreme court ruled that the basic form of fundraising, the fixed donation was not an income tax to lie down. in october 1993, evidently it has been alleged independently of the exempt organization of the irs, which are really give tax exemption, overruled the u.s. supreme court and gave them that tax deduction. how in the world can the irs overrule his judgment of the u.s. supreme court? >> are obviously better qualified to answer that than i am. would make is that exemption, they also were to the church the power to determine which of its own entities are tax exempt. i have been seeking that power myself. hubbard wrote innumerable novels. those of us are tax exempt. they have nothing to do with the church of scripture, but according to the irs is capacious judgment given to the church. all of that falls under the jurisdiction of religious literature. >> before he disappeared, indicated publicly they had spent $1 instigating the irs before that was given. who follows up on some unli
exemptions overruled the u.s. supreme court and gave them the tax deduction. power in the world could the irs overrule a judgment of u.s. supreme court? >> you're obviously better qualified to answer that than i am. [laughter] of the also awarded the church to power to determine which of its own entities are tax exempt i have been seeking the power of myself. [laughter] hubbard wrote novels and those are also tax-exempt. nothing to do with the churches scripture but capacious judgment given to the church all of that falls under the new jurisdiction of religious the literature. >> but before he disappeared indicated publicly they had spent $1 million investigating the ira's before that was given. who follows up on that in the structure? >> first of all, when you have a situation like that, it is the ideal place for the investigative reporter to go in and. i had many of the same questions about scientology. the windows need to reopen and progress have tried as much as i can i got a little cooperation from the churches self but awareness in the public and demand public officials we know more abo
been in all of this? where has the u.s. supreme court then? far from protecting the interests of discreet and insular minorities, far from doing that, the supreme court has been busy defending a war at every turn. the - u.s. supreme court over the last couple of decades has a disarrayed the protection against unreasonable searches and seizures granting to the police the authority to stop, chris, search just about anyone, anywhere, without any probable cause or reasonable suspicion not a shred of evidence of criminal activity as long as they get consent. now what is consent? it's when a police officer walks up to a young man. officer walks up to a young man with a hand on his gun and says to put your arms up in the air so i can see if you have anything on you. that young man just waved his fourth amendment rights against unreasonable searches and seizures law enforcement doesn't have to have a shred of evidence to support but not the young man has consented of course believing that he really had no ability to refuse consent and walk away. you might say these are just isolated i
demographics and birthrates could cause the u.s. to lose its place as a world leader sunday night at 9 eastern on "after words" on c-span2. and look for more online. like us on facebook. >> next on booktv, paul dickson presents a collection of words popularized by american presidents including warren g. harding's founding fathers invoked during his presidential campaign, theodore roosevelt's use of the word muckraker in a speech critical of specific journalists, and military industrial complex delivered by president eisenhower during his final presidential address to the american public in 1961. this is a little under an hour. [applause] >> thank you very much. i've been playing around with words for a long time, and i think when i was a kid, one of my -- i wasn't that athletic, and i wasn't that, you know, smart in various ways, but i could always go home and memorize a couple words, so i would learn words like apathetic and things like that. you know, for a third grader, it was a lot of fun. and as i got to be an older person, i got really fascinated by doing some tricks with words. one of m
describes the changes use by the u.s. military under the leadership of general david petraeus followed by our weekly afterwards program. john mackey's book is conscious capitalism. we conclude tonight's prime-time programming at 11:00 eastern with james votes's book freedom national taking a look at slavery 1861-1865. visit booktv.org for more on this weekend's television schedule. >> next on booktv, barbara matusow, editor of scooped it recounts the life of her career pulitzer prize-winning reporter jack nelson who died in 2009 at the age of 80. barbara matusow is joined by former president jimmy carter, former mayor of atlanta and u.s. ambassador to the united nations andrew young and former justice department spokesman terry adamson. it is a discussion of jack nelson's memoir "scoop: the evolution of a southern reporter". it is about an hour. >> good evening, everyone, good to have everyone here. my name is hank klibanoff and i will be moderating this wonderful panel tonight, as director of the journalism program at emory and co-author of the book about coverage of the civil rights
, former mayor of atlanta and u.s. ambassador to the united nations andrew young and former justice department spokesman, terry adamson, in discussion of jack nelson's memoir, "scoop". the evolution of a southern reporter. it's about an hour. . . >> and for co-sponsoring it, and also the emory university woodruff libraries, particularly the manuscript, archives and rare books library which houses the papers and the wisdom of a great number of southern journalists; white, african-american, of all sorts. and we're so pleased that five of those are pulitzer prize winners, and the latest among them is jack nelson. barbara was so generous and has made jack's papers our possession now, and there's some rich, rich history in them. and i encourage everyone to go to marble and take a look at them. we're here tonight to celebrate the life, the memoir, the papers of jack nelson with some people who knew him extremely well. jack was a man of enormous influence and consequence in the nation. the story of jack nelson, for those who don't know, is the story of news reporting in the latter half of
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)